Glenn Peers Ehem. Senior Fellow

Glenn Peers
Mai - August 2014

Vita

Glenn Peers is Professor of Art History with special regard to Early Medieval and Byzantine Art at the University of Texas at Austin. Peers received his M.A. from McGill University, Montréal in 1986 and gained his Ph.D. at John Hopkins University in Baltimore in 1995. From 1997 to 2004, he worked as an Assistant Professor at the University of Western Ontario and the University of Texas at Austin, where he was appointed Full Professor in 2009. In 2001, Peers earned a Licentiate in Mediaeval Studies as part of his fellowship at the University of Toronto. In addition, he has held various fellowships at institutions such as the University of Texas, the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton or the Internationales For-schungszentrum Kulturwissenschaften in Vienna. During 2011 and 2012, Peers served as Whitehead Professor at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens. His publication on “Sacred shock: Framing Visual Experience in Byzantium” was supported by a University Cooperative Society Subvention Grant awarded by the University of Texas at Austin. Furthermore, Peers curated an exhibition on the British photographer Liz Hingley in 2012 and worked as Guest Curator at the Menil Collection, Houston in 2013 for an exhibition entitled “Byzantine things in the world”.

Publikationen

Monographien

Sacred Shock: Framing Visual Experience in Byzantium. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press 2004.
Subtle Bodies: Representing Angels in Byzantium (=Transformations in Late Antiqui-ty, Vol. 32). Berkeley: University of California Press 2001.

Herausgaben

with Barbara Crostini: A Book of Psalms from Eleventh-Century Constantinople: On the Complex of Tests and Images in Vat. Gr. 752 (=Studi e Testi). Vatican City: Bib-lioteca Apostolica Vaticana, forthcoming 2014.
Byzantine Things in the World. Houston: Yale University Press 2013.

Artikel

“Introduction”. In: Glenn Peers (ed.): Byzantine Things in the World. Houston: Yale University Press 2013, pp. 21-84.
“Forging Byzantine Animals: Manuel Philes in Renaissance France”. In: Rivista di studi bizantini e neoellenici, 49, 2012, pp. 79-103.
“Object Relations: Theorizing the Late Antique Viewer”. In: Scott F. Johnson (ed.): The Oxford Handbook of Late Antiquity. New York: Oxford University Press 2012, pp. 970-993.
“Real-Living Painting: Quasi-Objects and Dividuation in the Byzantine World”. In: Religion and the Arts, 16/5, 2012, pp. 433-460.
“Utopia and Heterotopia: Byzantine Modernisms in America”. In: Karl Fugelso (ed.): Defining Neomedievalism(s) (=Studies in Medievalism, Vol. 19). Cambridge: D.S. Brewer 2010, pp. 77-113.
“Purposeful Polyvalency: the Stag and the Hunter Motif in the Twelfth-/Thirteenth-Century Frescoed Grotto at Kfar Shleiman, Sayyidat Naya, Lebanon”. In: Iconographica, 6, 2007, pp. 44-53.
“Vision and Community among Christians and Muslims: The Al-Muallaqa Lintel in Its Eighth-Century Context”. In: Arte medieval, 7/1, 2007, pp. 25-46.
“Thinking with Animals: Byzantine Natural History in Sixteenth-Century France”. In: Bibliothèque d’Humanisme et Renaissance, 68, 2006, pp. 457-484.