Lynn Spigel Ehem. Senior Fellow

Juni - Juli 2015

Vita

Lynn Spigel is a widely acclaimed media and television scholar and Frances E. Willard Pro-fessor of Screen Cultures at the School of Communication at Northwestern University. In 1988, Spigel received her Ph.D. in the Motion Picture/Television Division at University of California, Los Angeles, with a dissertation entitled “Installing the Television Set: The Social Construction of Television’s Place in the American Home, 1948-55”. From 1987 to 1991, she worked as Assistant Professor at the Department of Communication Arts at University of Wisconsin at Madison. In 1991, Spigel took a position as Associate Professor at University of Southern California, before being appointed Professor in 1997. Spigel transferred to North-western University in 2002. Since 1994, she has been the book series editor for the Console-ing Passion book series at Duke University Press. Furthermore, Spigel is a member of the editorial board of, among oth-ers, Television and New Media, Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies as well as the Journal of Games and Culture. Since 2008, she has been an advisory board member of the UCLA Film and Television Archives. Spigel has received the John Simon Guggenheim Me-morial Foundation Fellowship in 2012 as well as the Mellon Lectureship Fellowship, awarded by the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor in 2009. To name but a few, Spigel has given lec-tures at venues such as Université Panthéon-Assas (Paris 2), Universiteit van Amsterdam, Stockholm University, Harvard University or Princeton University.

Forschungsgebiete

TV and media theory; cultural history of media; media historiography; art and visual culture; science fiction and gender.

Publikationen

Monographien

TV by Design: Modern Art and the Rise of Network Television. Chicago: University of Chicago Press 2009.
Welcome to the Dreamhouse: Popular Media and Postwar Suburbs. Durham: Duke University Press 2001. Make Room for TV: Television and the Family Ideal in Postwar America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press 1992.

Herausgaben und Mitherausgaben

with Chris Berry, Soyoung Kim: Electronic Elsewheres: Media, Technology and the Experience of Social Space. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press 2010.
with Jan Olsson: Television after TV: Essays on a Medium in Transition. Durham: Duke University Press 2004.
with Michael Curtin: The Revolution wasn’t televised: Sixties Television and Social Conflict. New York: Routledge Press 1997.

Artikel

“Post-Feminist Nostalgia for a Pre-Feminist Future”. In: Screen, 54/2, 2013, pp. 270-278.
“Medienhaushalte. Damals und heute”. In: Zeitschrift für Medienwissenschaft, 9/2, 2013, pp. 74-95.
“Object Lessons for the Media Home: From Storagewall to Invisible Design”. In: Pub-lic Culture, 24/3, 2012, pp. 541-582.
“Smart Homes and Posthuman Domesticity”. In: Chris Berry, Soyoung Kim, Lynn Spigel (eds.): Electronic Elsewheres. Media, Technology and the Experience of Social Space. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press 2010, pp. 55-92.
“Our TV Heritage: Television, the Archive, and the Reasons for Preservation”. In: Janet Wasko (ed.): The Television Companion. London: Blackwell 2005, pp. 67-102.
“Designing the Smart House: Conspicuous Production and Posthuman Domesticity”. In: European Journal of Cultural Studies, 8/4, 2005, pp. 231-238.
“Television, the Housewife, and the Museum of Modern Art”. In: Jan Olsson, Lynn Spigel (eds.): Television after TV. Essays on a Medium in Transition. Durham: Duke University Press 2004, pp. 349-385.
“The Suburban Home Companion: Television and the Neighbourhood Ideal in Postwar America”. In: Beatriz Columina (ed.): Sexuality and Space: Princeton: Princeton School of Architecture Press 1992, pp. 185-217.